“Till All the Blood was Spent” – A Passover Poem

During this Easter season at Kosmosdale Baptist Church, we have been unfolding the plagues upon Egypt which culminate in the death of the firstborn son. But if families heeded the words of Moses, their firstborn sons didn’t have to die.

Passover smear above door

“Till All the Blood was Spent”
Written 3/23/18

Months it took to build the house
before which now he stood,
with sun above and shining on
the brick and stone and wood.

The door was closed with everyone
inside until the morn—
his love of fifteen years and,
at her side, their firstborn.

A boy! They praised the God who heard
their fervent prayers for life
inside the womb of her who thought
she was a barren wife.

At last a father, yet afraid
more now than e’er before,
he stood outside beneath the sun,
before his only door.

Had he heard the prophet right,
who spoke of death to fall
upon the firstborn sons that night,
no matter great or small?

With one hand he held the basin
full of blood he shed,
and with his other held the branch
now high above his head.

He moved his arm from side to side,
and smeared above the door
the blood until the branch was dry,
and then he dipped for more.

This time he started high and left
and drug his arm down slow,
as blood began to drip upon
his hand and feet below.

One more dip and one more side,
so high and right he went
and pulled his hand toward the ground
till all the blood was spent.

Stepping back, he saw the door
and thought of him he cherished,
his son—now covered by the blood—
and then said, “It is finished.”

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“This Father’s Prayer for Grace”

IMy first pic with Graysonn the amazing kindness of the Lord, today my wife Stacie and I rejoiced at the birth of
our fourth son, Grayson Mitchell Chase. He was 7 pounds 15 ounces, 20 inches long, and arrived at 5:44 pm in Louisville, Kentucky, at Norton Suburban Hospital.

Here is a poetic reflection and prayer on the day of Grayson’s birth.

“This Father’s Prayer for Grace”
May 2, 2017

Praise and honor be to God
who rules the depths and heights,
and knits inside a mother’s womb
an image-bearer’s life.

What joy to declare the birth
of Grayson Mitchell Chase!—
this one whom we have longed to see
and now hold face to face.

We pray his future steps you will
direct to this chief end:
to glorify and to enjoy
Your Son who saves from sin.

Our fourth son needs a heart to love
and eyes of faith to see
the Risen, Reigning Lord above
who sets the captive free.

Father, you alone can grant
this father’s prayer for grace:
that gospel light will dawn upon
my Grayson Mitchell Chase.

“This Temple Will Be Raised” – A Good Friday Poem

The people of Israel were familiar with a temple being destroyed and rebuilt. When Jesus tells the people in John 2:19, “Destroy this temple, and in three days I will raise it up,” the disciples later realized he was speaking about his body as a temple that would be destroyed and raised. Here is a Good Friday poem focusing on that temple motif:

jesus on the cross“This Temple Will Be Raised”
April 14, 2017

Seven years it took to build
The temple of the Lord,
That sacred space
And dwelling place
Where blood and life were poured.

But when the people saw the curse
That prophets warned would fall,
They strode the path
Of holy wrath,
And bitter was the gall.

Many years would pass before
The house, which fell by flame,
Was built to stand
In promised land
Once more for Yahweh’s name.

But all the blood of bulls and lambs
For sin could not atone,
So God the Son
Said, “It is done,”
And drank the cup alone.

Upon the hill they crucified
The temple of the Lord,
His body dead
Where, in our stead,
His blood and life were poured.

The people ’round the cross beheld
The one they deemed a fraud,
Who took the path
Of holy wrath,
The spotless Lamb of God.

Now he who once said, “In three days,
This temple will be raised,”
Who by the cross
Brought gain not loss,
Should be forever praised.

“Come, Thou Word” – A Christmas Hymn

The following lyrics of “Come, Thou Word” were composed to the tune of “Come, Thou Fount of Every Blessing.”

“Come, Thou Word”
December 20-21, 2016

Verse 1
Come, Thou Word, which with the Father
and the Spirit ever dwelled
And hath taken flesh to save us
from our sin and death and hell.
We behold Thee in Thy manger,
Fully God and fully man,
Myst’ry of the ages former,
Now revealed in Bethlehem.

Verse 2
Come, Thou King, whose birth the angel
Sang to shepherds in the night.
‘Round them came a host of heaven,
‘Round them shone a holy light.
“See I bring good news of great joy,
So no longer be afraid:
Christ the Lord, the promised Savior,
Unto you is born this day.”

Verse 3
Come, Thou Son, whose arms shall carry
Those fast-bound in chains of sin.
‘Mid this exile, ruined sinners
Shall be raised to life again.
He was born for our redemption,
O’er the manger loomed the Tree.
There in David’s little city
Lay the one who set us free.

“See This Child”–An Advent Poem for 2016

“See This Child”
December 6, 2016

See this child for whom all things
Are made and by whom held.
This mighty one, begotten Son,
Has come with men to dwell.

See this child with undefiled
Nature now asleep.
This righteous one, beloved Son,
Will scorn and murder reap.

See this child with tiny hands,
Who cries and must be fed.
This lowly one, a virgin’s Son,
Is everlasting bread.

See this child with infant smile
Whom heavenly host proclaim.
This worthy one, the royal Son,
Shall be for sinners slain.

See this child in swaddling cloths
And in a manger laid.
This gentle one, the promised Son,
Has come to kill the grave.

“My Son, Arise”–A Poem for Easter Sunday

“My Son, Arise”
Easter Sunday
April 5, 2015

The lungs had not inhaled a breath
Since He had closed His eyes in death.

Now covered by the sealing stone,
The Nazarene lay there alone.

Then when two nights had fully passed,
The third day morning came at last.

The Father said, “My son, arise!”
And Jesus opened up His eyes.

The new creation had begun,
For curse and death were now undone.