10 Questions for a Child Who Wants to be Baptized

Over the years I’ve had the great blessing of sitting down with children who want to be baptized. During such a meeting, there are specific questions I want to explore, though they are not all of equal merit. Depending on the age of the child, some questions may require more elaboration than others so that the child can understand what I’m asking.

Though we will invariably discuss more than what follows below, these 10 questions (and sub-questions) set the tone and direction of our meeting, and the quality of the child’s responses serves as a helpful guide for whether I’ll be moving to the stage of baptism or whether further time and training is needed first. While the main questions should be presented, certain sub-questions may exceed the understanding of some children at the time.

(1) Why do you want to be baptized?
-Where did you hear about baptism?
-How long have you wanted to be baptized?

(2) What do you think baptism means?
-Do you think baptism makes you a Christian?
-Why should Christians be baptized?
-Why should we be baptized under water then lifted out? 

(3) What do you believe the Bible teaches about Jesus?
-Where did he come from?
-Did he ever do anything wrong?
-Why did he die?
-What happened on the third day after he died?
-How was/is Jesus different from other people?

(4) What is sin?
-Who sins? 
-Do you believe you’ve sinned?
-Whom do we sin against?

(5) What is the consequence of sin?
-What kinds of consequences do people face in this world when they sin?
-What is the ultimate consequence of sin after death?

(6) What does it mean to trust in Jesus?
-What does it mean to worship something?
-What makes you want to trust someone?
-Should we believe what Jesus claims about Himself?
-What does it mean to confess Jesus as “Lord”?

(7) What does it mean to repent (turn from) sin?
-Why should we turn from sin?
-Since Jesus forgives our sins, is it okay to love sin now?
-How should a Christian learn to think about his/her sin?

(8) What happens to people who do not trust in Jesus as their Savior?
-Why does hell exist?
-Is God mean because people will be in hell?

-How long does hell last?
-Can anyone be rescued out of hell?

(9) What are ways people can learn about Jesus?
-Do you own a Bible? Do you read it? 
-Do you attend church? 
-Do your parents talk to you about Jesus?

(10) How can you learn to obey Jesus at your age?
-How can you obey Jesus at school?
-How can you obey Jesus at church?
-How can you obey Jesus at home?

 

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Poetry of Passion Week 2014

It was a great joy to reflect on Passion Week this year through the avenue of poetry. Here’s how that unfolded:

“Hosanna” – Palm Sunday

“With Zeal and Holy Flame” – Monday

“A Coming Day” – Tuesday

“Thirty Silver Pieces” – Wednesday

“See Him” – Thursday

“A River Flowed” – Friday

“Silent, Still, and Cold” – Saturday

“Rise” – Easter Sunday

 

 

 

“Rise”–A Poem for Easter Sunday

Glorious news: Jesus is alive, risen indeed from the dead and never to die again. Women went to his tomb on the first day of the week, and they found the stone rolled and body gone. Wouldn’t you have some questions if you came upon such a scene? Imagine you’re asking the following ones, and God answers. [This format is inspired by the wonderful poem “God Answers” by John Piper.]

“Rise”
April 20, 2014
Easter Sunday

Where was the body when the women
Came at Sunday’s dawn?
Gone.

But how? What happened to the stone that
Sealed the body cold?
Rolled.

Were not the soldiers there to guard?
What did they feel, if near?
Fear.

How many thieves were needed to
Ensure the deed was done?
None.

If the body was not stolen,
What else is there but fraud?
God.

What did that body do while it was
Hidden from their eyes?
Rise.

From death? To life? How can we tell
The world this news we know?
Go.

 

“Silent, Still, and Cold”–A Poem for Saturday of Passion Week

On Saturday, the tomb was occupied with the crucified and dead body of Jesus the Nazarene. I wrote the following poetic reflection two years ago, but I’m including it in this week’s poetic Passion posts.

“Silent, Still, and Cold”
April 19, 2014 (first written April 7, 2012)
Saturday of Passion Week

On Saturday his body lay
Silent, still, and cold,
Entombed for one more night before
The stone began to roll.

Darkness seemed to triumph while
God the Son lay dead,
But in the morn his hands would pull
The cloth from ’round his head.

Disciples, now consumed with fear,
Did mourn their master’s death.
Yet joy would rise with Sunday’s sun
And new creation’s breath.

For one more night all hope seemed lost
As death claimed the last word,
But this second day would end with
Resurrection on the third.

 

“A River Flowed”–A Poem for Friday of Passion Week

On Good Friday of Passion Week, Jesus died on the cross. Last year I wrote a poem about the cross, and I’m including it among the Passion Week poems I’ve been posting this year.

“A River Flowed”
April 18, 2014 (first written March 29, 2013)
Friday of Passion Week 

A river flowed, a crimson tide,
With mercy in its stream,
As Jesus Christ was crucified
By God through human scheme.

The sin he bore was not his own,
For ours he carried to
The wooden cross, the judgment tree,
To pay the wages due.

Hear him cry out “It is finished”
With his final breath,
For with this love he satisfied
God’s wrath and died our death.

“See Him”–A Poem for Thursday of Passion Week

On Thursday of Passion Week, Jesus ate the last supper with his disciples, prophesied that they would scatter because of him, and prayed in Gethsemane with a soul full of sorrow. This is a poetic reflection on those events.

“See Him”
April 17, 2014
Thursday of Passion Week

See him in the upper room
With all of them together.
So much to say, so much to pray,
Before the night is over.

See him break the bread and say,
“My body, take and eat.”
Then the cup, raised up: “My blood
Poured out for you—now drink.”

See him warn them, “This night you
Will fall away and flee.”
Then Peter, louder than the rest,
Says, “Everyone but me.”

See him at Gethsemane
As he kneels to speak,
With sorrow in his holy soul
And friends whose flesh is weak.

See him fall upon his face:
“O Father let this cup
Pass from me, yet your will be done,
For you shall raise me up.”

 

“Thirty Silver Pieces”–A Poem for Wednesday of Passion Week

Today is Wednesday, and we remember several events that occurred on that day during Passion Week. Particularly important was the agreement of Judas to betray Jesus for thirty pieces of silver. This poem reflects on that agreement.

“Thirty Silver Pieces”
April 16, 2014
Wednesday of Passion Week

The chief priests and elders gathered together
To plot how they might arrest and kill Jesus,
For two days away was the start of Passover,
But no plan was certain until they saw Judas.

Into the palace of Caiaphas came
One of the Twelve in sinister stride,
And though Judas seemed to come in alone,
Satan himself was dwelling inside.

“What will you give me if I would betray him?”
They said, “You like silver? How ’bout thirty pieces?”
Then Judas agreed and gathered the sum
And looked for a time to turn over Jesus.